Silo is a London design studio formed by Attua Aparicio and Oscar Lessing who, taking inspiration from industrial processes, try to replicate them through a simpler and more imaginative way.

Founded by the pair when they were both students at the renowned Royal College of Art, in London, Silo Studio – despite its relatively young age – has already received numerous accolades. Immediately after graduation, they became the first designers in residence at Jablite, the largest polystyrene factory in the UK after impressing the management with their creations using the material to produce furniture. Since then they have shown their creations at Salone del Mobile in Milan, the London Design Festival and at the Design Museum in London. More recently, one of their latest collaboration has been with the Danish brand Hay with Tela, a series of textile molded glass creations.

Polpettas met one of the founders, Attua Aparicio, to discover more about the studio.

silo_studio_london_design_portrait-by-kat-green

WHO’S BEHIND SILO? 

Oscar [Lessing, one of the brains behind Silo] and I went to RCA – Royal College of Art – together and attended the same course, Product Design, from 2009 to 2011. After doing a project together, things went organically and we ended setting up Silo studio together. 

HOW DID IT START? 

We started collaborating when we both signed for a RoboFold workshop (a technology that allows folding metals with robots) at the RCA. Our idea was to use this machine to create furniture. However, we soon realised that it was very expensive using this technology to fold metal. So we thought: “Instead of making a chair let’s make a mold with the RoboFold”. And from there everything else it just happened organically. It wasn’t a strategic choice. At the beginning of the project we went to school very early in the morning and we were the last to leave. Each of us had a project but we were dedicating little time if compared to the main “big project”. Eventually, our tutors saw that both of us were dedicated in equal measure to the big project so they let us graduating together. And we set up Silo.

WHEN YOU GRADUATED YOU RECEIVED VERY POSITIVE REVIEWS AND FEEDBACKS FOR YOUR USE OF POLYSTYRENE. WHEN DID YOU START WORKING WITH THIS MATERIAL?

We started working with polystyrene because of different factors. As I told you, everything started when we signed up for the RoboFold workshop. Once we realised that our idea wouldn’t work because of budget and time – we were very tight on time as it was January (2011) and we had to graduate that June – Oscar mentioned me about a material, Polystyrene, that needed only 100 degrees to expands. This is a temperature that it’s very easy to reach just when boiling water.

After the first day of the workshop, with the realisation that we could not use this technique, came also a plan B.  I told Oscar that maybe we could do without the RoboFold and make our mold without metal. We started experimenting using fabric molds and polystyrene and we had interesting results. We invented a technique for our furniture by steaming polystyrene beads inside fabric molds. The project had to last only three weeks but then we kept working together. 1_Silo_Studio_london_design

WHAT WAS THE RESULT OF YOUR EXPERIMENTS?

NSEPS (Not So Expanded Polystyrene) which is a play on the name of the plastic which normally is called EP – Expanded Polystyrene. When we graduated we had a lot of good reviews. We were asked to do an exhibition in London, in a gallery called Marsden Woo which focus on craft gallery.

In the same period, Bloomberg commissioned us some pieces for ‘Waste not want it’, an initiative that has been running for while now in which they ask designers and artists to make a permanent installation up-cycling their waste. The finished pieces are hosted for a year in their London headquarters.

WHAT DID YOU CREATE FOR BLOOMBERG? 

Bloomberg has a warehouse in London where it keeps and manages its own waste. Among all the objects that we found there, we decided to use their keyboards to do our project. We had 2,000 Kg keyboards. We disassembled them to get just the keys. We decided to use their keyboards because they had bright colors and the are made of a very good quality of plastic (all Bloomberg hardware is made in-house).

They wanted some chairs and tables so we made a seating space for meetings where there was the same shape, and according to the height of the legs, we went creating from a stool to a gazebo. There was a table, a low table, stools, chairs. I think we made about 20-something pieces.

3_silo_studio_london_design_glass

AND THEN YOU CREATED YOUR TELA COLLECTION… 

Actually, before we developed the textile molded glass with Marsden Woo. These were handmade. We experimented with textile molding using different materials. We found a textile which is made of silica that it can be heated at 1000 degrees and it doesn’t burn. We also did some aluminum cast into metal using the same technique. But we stopped doing that as we found out another designer that. So we decided to stick with glass.

HOW DID YOU END UP COLLABORATING WITH HAY? 

A guy that studied at RCA with us, a year junior, was working for HAY. Once he came to Marsden Woo and saw our textile molded glasses. He liked them so much he asked us to make him a couple for his girlfriend as a birthday present. As he had them in the office to prevent to spoil the surprise, they were spotted by Sebastian Wrong who works for the Danish company. We knew him already as he had done some tutorial with us at RCA. We went to the office for an interview and we got the commission. Our Tela collection in collaboration with HAY was born.

hay_glassware_tela_silo_studio_london_design hay_glassware_silo_studio_london_design

HOW DID YOU COME UP WITH THE NEWTON BOWL INSTEAD? 

Newton just happened. Both of us was thinking of producing something that involved spinning. We started trying with metal and pouring it. It was working but it was not very exciting in the sense that it was a very expensive way of doing it. At that time I was using jesmonite because I was experimenting with magnets. We started experimenting with that and it was much nicer because the colors are really sharp and this material it’s harder than plastic.

Newton is made of jesmonite and instead of mixing it with water it’s mixed with lithium so that the colors are brighter. Usually, our color palette is white, black and a bright color as in our brand identity.

HOW IS NEWTON MADE? 

We produced our own machine. It’s like a potter’s wheel in a way, but instead of having a flat surface where you would normally put the clay on it, it has a bowl in which we put liquid plaster in different colors. We fill this bowl with liquid and while the bowl spins the liquid creates a parabola that then creates its own geometrical pattern.

_silo_studio_london_design

YOUR COLOR PALETTE IS MADE OF NEUTRAL AND PRIMARY COLORS. WHY DID YOU CHOOSE THIS SCHEME?

Silo’s color palette happened almost by accident. When we started with the polystyrene you could get it only in white/black and orange plus some rare hot pink, yellow and green therefore, we carried on with this color combination. If polystyrene had been available only in black, probably our color identity would have been different.

IS THERE ANY OTHER PROJECT YOU ARE WORKING ON?

Magnets is another project that I personally have been working on for a long time on my own. I use jesmonite. I put the iron powder in the mix and I make molds that have magnets in the molds. The iron powder is attracted by the magnets. Once the iron powder is set, you end up with a piece that has this specific design created by magnets.

Before going to the RCA I used to work in a porcelain company and there I got exposed to molds. I find them very interesting. In the future, I also want to start making flooring/surfaces.

WHERE DO YOU GET YOUR INSPIRATION?

I am not sure as we generally don’t make things just for the sake of making. It’s more like we try to find new ways of making things. With bowls, it seems as we have a kind of an obsession of making bowls. I’d like to do other things.

WHERE DOES THE NAME SILO COME FROM? 

Silo or ‘sailo’,  it depends on how you pronounce it. When still at RCA we were looking for a studio. One day we went to visit the factory that was sponsoring our polystyrene project. I saw they had silos in their factory and then I realised that it was the same used in Spanish. We looked a bit at what silo meant – as I always do when I have a brief – and I found out that the root of this word is very similar in many languages.  Apparently, the root of this word comes from an old Iberian word so it sounded perfect to us.

YOUR LAST PROJECT WITH SILO WAS SHOWN DURING THE 2016 LONDON DESIGN FESTIVAL. CAN YOU TELL ME MORE?

The last project we made was for Ready-Made-Go, an initiative set up by the magazine Modern Design Review during the LDF -London Design Festival.

Modern Design Review had access to the shopping list of the ACE hotel and then asked designers to create what the hotel needs with a pre-set budget. They commissioned us 500 soap dishes. Usually, we’d create our techniques but normally they are very labor intensive. Having very little time we created something that could be done in a factory. We had them made in the Birmingham area where there are all the factories. To make them artsier, once they arrived in our studio, we heated the pieces on one side. The heat, in fact, changes the color of the metal.

ace-hotel_silo_studio_london_design ace-hotel_silo_studio_london_design_

THE LAUNDRY ROOM

 

If you were a fruit, what will you be? 

Definitely not berries. They are too sour for my likings.

A designer that influenced you.

Victor Papanek and his book Design for the real world. It’s from the 70s. He was a designer environmentalist and philosopher ahead of his time.

Music you are listening at the moment.

My partner’s music. Usually, he has a Brazilian playlist. Currently, I am listening to Caetano Veloso e Os Mutantes.

What would you change in your job?

Emails.

A person that inspires you? 

My dad. He’s very brave, he has his own way to understand how things should be, and he never gives up.

If you were to choose a place to live?

Uhm…I don’t know. Every time I go on holiday somewhere, I can’t help imagining myself living there. I find quite hard the idea of settling. In a way, I can’t wait to settle down but I’d also love to experience life in different places. I’d like to live in Mexico or in rural Spain. Somewhere close by the mountains.

The first thing you do in the morning and the last at night prior to going to bed.

Drink a cup of tea.

Is there any artist you’d like to collaborate with? 

Yes, my sister Saelia Aparicio and her expanded drawings!

To follow the projects of Silo Studio and keep you updated on their works, have a look to their Facebook page and Instagram profile.

 

Italian version

Silo è uno studio di design londinese fondato da Attua Aparicio e Oscar Lessing che, prendendo spunto dai processi industriali, prova a replicarli attraverso un modo più semplice e più fantasioso.

Fondato dalla coppia quando erano entrambi studenti presso il rinomato Royal College of Art di Londra, Silo Studio – nonostante la sua età relativamente giovane – ha già ricevuto numerosi riconoscimenti. Subito dopo la laurea, Silo è stato il primo studio di design in residence presso Jablite, la più grande fabbrica di polistirolo nel Regno Unito dopo aver stupito i grandi capi creando mobili in polistirolo. Da quando hanno iniziato hanno esposto le loro creazioni al Salone del Mobile di Milano, al London Design Festival e al Design Museum di Londra. Una delle loro ultime collaborazioni è stata infine con il marchio danese HAY, che ha prodotto Tela, una serie di creazioni in vetro ‘stampate’ con motivi tessili.

Polpettas ha incontrato una dei fondatori, Attua Aparicio, per scoprire di più sullo studio.

CHI C’È DIETRO SILO?

Oscar [Lessing, una delle menti dietro Silo] e io abbiamo frequentato insieme l’RCA – Royal College of Art – e abbiamo seguito lo stesso corso di Product Design dal 2009 al 2011. Dopo aver fatto un progetto insieme, le cose si sono svolte organicamente e, dopo la laurea abbiamo fondato Silo insieme.

COME È INIZIATA LA VOSTRA COLLABORAZIONE?

Abbiamo iniziato a collaborare quando entrambi abbiamo partecipato a un workshop di RoboFold (una tecnologia che permette di piegare metalli grazie a dei robot) quando eravamo ancora al RCA. La nostra idea era quella di usare questa macchina per creare mobili. Tuttavia, appena ci siamo resi conto che questa tecnologia era molto costosa ci siamo un po’ scoraggiati. Così ci siamo detti: “Invece di fare direttamente una sedia facciamo uno stampo con il RoboFold”. E da lì tutto è successo organicamente, non è stata una scelta strategica: all’inizio del progetto andavamo a scuola molto presto la mattina ed eravamo gli ultimi a tornare a casa. Ognuno di noi aveva un progetto personale ma ci dedicavamo solo dei ritagli di tempo rispetto al “grande progetto”! Alla fine, i nostri tutors hanno visto che entrambi ci dedicavamo in egual misura al lavoro con RoboFold quindi ci hanno permesso di presentare il progetto di laurea assieme e abbiamo fondato Silo.

QUANDO VI SIETE LAUREATI AVETE RICEVUTO RECENSIONI E COMMENTI MOLTO POSITIVI PER L’UTILIZZO DEL POLISTIROLO. QUANDO AVETE INIZIATO A LAVORARE CON QUESTO MATERIALE?

Abbiamo iniziato a lavorare con il polistirolo a causa di diversi fattori. Tutto è cominciato quando abbiamo partecipato al workshop RoboFold. Una volta realizzato che la nostra idea di creare uno stampo con il RoboFold non funzionava a causa di  budget e di tempo – era gennaio (2011) e dovevamo laurearci a giugno – Oscar accennò al polistirolo che aveva bisogno di una temperatura molto bassa per espandersi -all’incirca 100°. Questa temperatura è molto facile da raggiungere – ad esempio quando si fa bollire l’acqua.

Dopo il primo giorno del workshop, con la consapevolezza che non avremmo potuto usare questa tecnica, abbiamo pensato a un piano B. Dissi ad Oscar : “Forse potremmo fare a meno del RoboFold e creare il nostro stampo senza metallo”. Abbiamo iniziato a sperimentare con stampi di tessuto e polistirolo, ottenendo risultati interessanti. Abbiamo inventato questa tecnica per i nostri mobili, mettendo delle perle di polistirolo all’interno di stampi di tessuto e facendole espandere tramite vapore. Il progetto doveva durare solo tre settimane ma alla fine abbiamo continuato a lavorare insieme.

4_silo_studio_london_design

QUAL È STATO IL RISULTATO DEI VOSTRI ESPERIMENTI?

NSEPS (Not So Expanded Polystyrene) che è un gioco sul nome della plastica che normalmente viene chiamata EP – Polistirolo Espanso. Quando ci siamo laureati abbiamo avuto un sacco di recensioni positive. Ci è stato chiesto di fare una mostra a Londra, in una galleria chiamata Marsden Woo che è specializzata in arte e artigianalità.

Nello stesso periodo, Bloomberg ci ha commissionato alcuni pezzi per  Waste not want it, un’iniziativa – ormai attiva già da un paio d’edizioni –  in cui si chiede a designer e artisti di fare un’installazione permanente riciclando i loro loro rifiuti. I pezzi finiti vengono ospitati per un anno nella loro sede di Londra.

COSA AVETE CREATO PER BLOOMBERG? 

Bloomberg ha un magazzino a Londra dove gestisce e mantiene i suoi rifiuti. Tra tutti gli oggetti che abbiamo trovato lì, abbiamo deciso di utilizzare delle tastiere per realizzare il nostro progetto per loro. Abbiamo trovato 2.000 Kg di tastiere, le abbiamo smontate per usare solo i tasti, perché avevano dei colori vivaci e sono realizzate con una plastica di ottima qualità. (Bloomberg Tutto l’hardware è realizzato in-house).

Volevano alcune sedie e tavoli così abbiamo realizzato una sala conferenze open space dove si ripeteva la stessa forma che, in base all’altezza delle gambe, si risolveva in pezzi che andavano da uno sgabello a un gazebo. C’erano un tavolo, un tavolino basso, sgabelli, sedie, penso che alla fine abbiamo fatto una ventina di pezzi.

E POI È ARRIVATA LA VOSTRA COLLEZIONE TELA

In realtà, prima abbiamo sviluppato il vetro con la stampa “effetto tessile” con Marsden Woo. I primi esemplari, infatti, sono stati fatti artigianalmente. Abbiamo sperimentato la ‘stampa’ con diversi materiali tessili, alla fine abbiamo trovato un tessuto che è fatto di silice e che può essere riscaldato a 1000°C senza bruciarsi. Abbiamo anche fatto esperimenti con degli stampi in alluminio, secondo la stessa tecnica, ma durò poco perchè abbiamo scoperto che c’era già un altro designer che lo faceva, oltretutto con ottimi risultati, così abbiamo deciso di limitarci al vetro.

 Tela x HAY_Silo Studio design

COM’È NATA LA COLLABORAZIONE CON HAY QUINDI?

Un ragazzo che ha studiato con noi al RCA, di un anno più giovane di noi, stava lavorando per HAY, e per pura coincidenza ha visto i nostri bicchieri con la stampa “effetto tessile” da Marsden Woo . Gli sono piaciuti così tanto che ci ha chiesto di farne un paio per la sua ragazza come regalo di compleanno. Siccome li aveva tenuti in ufficio per evitare di rovinare la sorpresa, sono stati ‘scoperti’ per caso da Sebastian Wrong che lavora per la società danese. Noi lo conoscevamo già perchè aveva fatto qualche incontro con noi quando eravamo studenti al RCA. Siamo andati in ufficio per un colloquio e abbiamo ottenuto la commissione per la produzione dei nostri prototipi. Da qui è nata la nostra linea, Tela x HAY

COME VI È VENUTA INVECE L’IDEA PER LA CIOTOLA NEWTON?

Newton è capitata per caso.

Entrambi pensavamo di produrre qualcosa che avesse a che fare con il movimento rotatorio. Tutto iniziò lavorando il metallo liquido, che funzionava ma non era molto eccitante il risultato finale, nel senso che diventava solo un modo molto costoso per fare una ciotola. A quel tempo stavo usando il materiale jesmonite (una resina acrilica, ndr) perché stavo sperimentando con i magneti. Abbiamo provato con questo nuovo materiale e il risultato finale risultò molto più soddisfacente perché i colori del materiale di partenza erano molto più vivi e la jesmonite è molto più dura della plastica.

Newton è fatta di jesmonite che, invece di essere mescolata con acqua, è mescolata con litio in modo tale che i colori siano più brillanti. Di solito, la nostra tavolozza dei colori è composta da bianco, nero e un colore brillante, come nella nostra identità di marca.

COM’È FATTA NEWTON?

Abbiamo prodotto una macchina per conto nostro. E’ come una specie di tornio, ma invece di avere una superficie piana in cui normalmente mettere l’argilla, c’è una ciotola in cui si versa la jesmonite in diversi colori. Riempiamo il contenitore di liquido e, mentre la ciotola gira, il liquido crea una parabola che crea il motivo geometrico vero e proprio.5_silo_studio_london_design

LA TAVOLOZZA DI SILO È FATTA DI COLORI NEUTRI E SOLO ALCUNI COLORI PRIMARI. PERCHÉ AVETE SCELTO QUESTO SCHEMA?

La tavolozza dei colori di Silo è nata quasi per caso. Quando abbiamo iniziato con il polistirolo i colori disponibili erano solo in bianco, il nero e l’arancione, dunque abbiamo portato avanti questa combinazione di colori. Se il polistirolo fosse stato disponibile solo in nero, probabilmente la nostra identità sarebbe stata diversa.

C’È QUALCHE ALTRO PROGETTO SU CUI STATE LAVORANDO?

Io personalmente sto lavorando da un po’ di tempo con i magneti e con la jesmonite. Metto la polvere di ferro nel mix e faccio stampi che al loro interno hanno dei magneti. La polvere di ferro viene attratta dai magneti. Una volta che la polvere di ferro è solidificata si ottiene un pezzo che ha un disegno specifico creato da magneti.

Prima di andare alla RCA ho lavorato in una ditta di porcellana ed è lì che ho avuto modo di approfondire l’uso degli stampi, li trovo molto interessanti. In futuro mi piacerebbe iniziare a fare anche pavimenti e superfici.

DA DOVE PRENDETE ISPIRAZIONE?

In realtà non ne sono sicura, ma quello che posso dire è che non facciamo le cose solo per il gusto di farle. Cerchiamo, invece, di trovare nuovi modi di dar vita alle cose. Con le ciotole… sembra come se avessimo una sorta di ossessione!

DA DOVE VIENE IL NOME SILO?

E’ Silo o ‘Sailo’, dipende come lo pronunci. Quando eravamo ancora al RCA eravamo alla ricerca di uno studio. Un giorno siamo andati a visitare la fabbrica che era promotrice del nostro progetto con il polistirolo, e lì ho visto che avevano dei silos. Successivamente ho realizzato che la stessa parola viene utilizzata anche in spagnolo, così abbiamo cercato il significato di silos, e ho scoperto che la radice di questa parola è simile in molte lingue. A quanto pare, la radice della parola viene da una vecchia parola iberica, il che sembrava perfetto per noi!

IL VOSTRO ULTIMO PROGETTO È STATO ESPOSTO DURANTE IL LONDON DESIGN FESTIVAL. CI RACCONTI QUALCOSA? 

L’ultimo progetto che abbiamo realizzato è stato per Ready-Made-Go, iniziativa messa a punto dalla rivista Modern Design Review durante il LDF (London Design Festival). Modern Design Review ha avuto accesso alla “shopping list” del ACE Hotel e poi ha chiesto a dei designer di crearli con un budget prestabilito.

Ci hanno commissionato 500 portasapone. Di solito realizziamo i pezzi secondo le nostre tecniche “speciali” ma in questo caso ci voleva troppo tempo. Così abbiamo creato qualcosa che potesse essere fatto in fabbrica. Alla fine questi portasapone sono stati realizzati nella zona industriale di Birmingham. Per donargli un tocco più artistico abbiamo riscaldato i pezzi su un lato: il calore, infatti, cambia il colore del metallo.

THE LAUNDRY ROOM

Se tu fossi un frutto, che cosa saresti?

Sicuramente non frutti di bosco. Sono troppo acidi per i miei gusti.

Un designer che ti ha influenzato.

Victor Papanek e il suo libro Design per il mondo reale. E’ degli anni ’70. Era un ambientalista progettista e filosofo in anticipo sui tempi.

Musica che stai ascoltando al momento. 

La musica del mio compagno. Di solito è una playlist di musica brasiliana. Attualmente sto ascoltando Gaetano Veloso e Os Mutantes.

Cosa cambieresti del tuo lavoro?

Meno emails.

Una persona che ti ispira?

Mio padre. È molto coraggioso, ha il suo proprio modo di intendere come le cose dovrebbero essere, e non si arrende mai.

Se si dovesse scegliere un posto dove vivere. 

Uhm … non lo so. Ogni volta che vado in vacanza da qualche parte, non posso fare a meno d’immaginarmi che possa abitarci. Trovo molto difficile l’idea di ‘sistemarsi’. In un certo senso, non vedo l’ora di sistemarmi, però mi piacerebbe anche sperimentare la vita in luoghi diversi. Vorrei vivere in Messico o nella campagna spagnola. Da qualche parte vicino alle montagne.

La prima cosa che fai al mattino e l’ultima prima di andare a letto.

Bere una tazza di tè.

C’è qualche artista con il quale vorresti collaborare? 

Sì, mia sorella Saelia Aparicio e i suoi disegni ‘espansi’!

Per tenervi aggiornati su Silo Studio, i loro nuovi lavori e gli ultimi progetti, seguite la loro pagina Facebook e il profilo Instagram.