Why are we so fascinated by minimalism of Japanese architecture? Because Japanese architecture has an organizing power able to tidy our messy lives. We look for squared geometric shapes to manage our daily “West”, hoping to reach our landing tatami.

Common Places

Banana Yoshimoto’s Kitchen says The place I like best in this world is the kitchen. No matter where it is, no matter what kind, if it’s a kitchen […] Now only the kitchen and I are left. It’s just a little nicer than being all alone.”

Japanese Architecture

Pao 1, Dwelling for a Tokyo Nomad Woman by Toyo Ito

Japanese Architecture

The Japanese House @Maxxi, House at Yaizu

I have always connected Japanese architecture with loneliness. In people’s mind a Japanese house is often a smart futuristic cell in which a person barely can stand. Or a big residence so tiny and so empty to look like a deserted showroom. Or even a traditional dwelling made of wood and rice paper surrounded by cherry trees. One way or another, they are all places for lonely people.  

Japanese Architecture

Tradional Houses Plans

However, the tatami – icon of Japanese architecture- is a traditional place of sharing. Generally we identify Japanese domestic space with a tatami, imaging a family sitting on the floor of a living room full of big door windows. When you were children watching Japanese anime have you ever asked yourselves: “Why do they take their shoes off at the entrance?” because it is forbidden walk on the tatami with shoes. The tatami is a rice straw carpet covered by rush plant and surrounded by black cotton hems. In the tatami people eat, sit and sleep: tatami means home.

Japanese Architecture

Modular tatami

Beyond the contemplative image of tatami, zaibatsu, cyberpunk science fiction and tamagotchi had manipulated the perception of Japan among fellows of my generation. Harmonious elements from Meiji period were mixed with post-atomic nightmares. A messy mix like Bamboo Houses by David Sylvian and Ryuichi Sakamoto.

Yasujiro Ozu’s movies tried to spread the human side of Japan, but nobodies believed that. In his movies all characters were so polite and good-mannered to appear even more lonely. It seemed that his actors were posing in barren, perfect and harmonious places. The protagonist was only passing within eternal rooms without leaving any tracks but  only a fast introspective monologue.

The Japanese Order

Geometric shapes, minimalism, dialogue with nature, contrasting materials: in Japanese architecture everything is too perfect to be real. Vincent Hecht’s Japanese Collection explains the monochromatic austerity of Japanese minimalism which inspired the whole world. Japanese architectonic language is able to organize the space of our chaotic reality.

This is why we love so much Japanese minimalism? Is for its harmonious ability of connection? Is for its ability to simplify? Is for its smart pragmatism? The answer is yes. Japanese visual language has the power of organize the reality, putting things right.  

Japanese Architecture

The Japanese House @Maxxi. Sketches

Japanese Architecture

The Japanese House @Maxxi. Notebook

Douglas Coupland’s novel God Hates Japan tells Hiro Tanaka’s story and the end of his lousy life after a series of different kinds of catastrophes. Why do Japanese people have this peculiar organizing power? The answer is in this book. Earthquakes, tsunami, atomic bomb, biological attacks: even if God hates Japan -at least a bit-, modern secularized Japanese people faced God’s fury with order. And we actually envy them for that.

Japanese Architecture

God Hates Japan covers

Maybe it is not a case that The Japanese House is the most orderly, functional and harmonious exhibition I have ever seen. The Japanese House is a project focusing entirely on Japanese House from 1945 until now run by Maxxi in Rome, Momat in Tokyo and Barbican in London, where the exhibition will open again on  March 23rd until June 25th.

Japanese Architecture

The Japanese House @Maxxi, exhibition setup

Japanese Architecture

The Japanese House @Maxxi, exhibition setup

Although it was a crowded Sunday, the museum was like a Shinto temple. A magic spell perfectly designed by Japanese studio Atelier Bow-Wow in charge of the exhibition setup. More than 60 artists, about 80 models, photographs, notebooks, sketches were arranged in a orderly and harmonious way creating a new spiritual dimension. Visitors were acting like in a spiritual place.

Japanese Architecture

The Japanese House @Maxxi, Detail

Japanese Architecture

The Japanese House @Maxxi, Detail

Japanese Architecture

The Japanese House @Maxxi, House N

Japanese Architecture

The Japanese House @Maxxi, Atelier Tenjinyama

The exhibition shows about half century of Japanese architecture focusing on single-family house. The exhibition moves from the “tension between modernity and Japaneseness following the war onto the metabolic utopias of the 60s and the minimalism of the 90s, before introducing us to the current renewed focus on the vernacular and the use of simple materials”.

Japanese Architecture

The Japanese House @Maxxi, Split Machiya

Japanese Architecture

The Japanese House @Maxxi, Split Machiya

Japanese Architecture

The Japanese House @Maxxi, Split Machiya

The exhibition represents in a form and with substance the peculiar Japanese therapeutic minimalism. Going through 14 thematic areas, however, it is possible to find unexpected shades: Ito and Sakamoto’s experiments; Shinohara’s sensorial language; irony of Face House and Anti-Dwelling Box and the nostalgic touch of contemporary Machiya (buildings of Edo period) like House NA, House, O-ta and Moriyama House.

Japanese Architecture

The Japanese House @Maxxi, House in Rokko

Japanese Architecture

The Japanese House @Maxxi, Face House

Japanese Architecture

The Japanese House @Maxxi, S-House

Japanese Architecture

The Japanese House @Maxxi, Anti-Dwelling Box

Japanese Architecture

The Japanese House @Maxxi, Roof House

Japanese Architecture

The Japanese House @Maxxi, The Farmer’s House

The Wild West

Japanese architecture is able to solve and simplify the emotional connection between a person and the space. Putting at the center what the space represents for the dweller, the Japanese house is able to interact even with the surrounding space in a synergistic and smart way.

Japanese Architecture

The Japanese House @Maxxi, Yokohama Apartment

Japanese Architecture

The Japanese House @Maxxi, Yokohama Apartment

Japanese Architecture

The Japanese House @Maxxi, Yokohama Apartment

Japanese Architecture

The Japanese House @Maxxi, Yokohama Apartment

Japanese Architecture

The Japanese House @Maxxi, Yokohama Apartment

Japanese Architecture

The Japanese House @Maxxi, Yokohama Apartment

This is the reason why Japanese architecture can be considered what is in between the tatami and the West. The tatami is the domestic space which finds its meaning inside the Japanese house. The Japanese house thanks to its features organizes the space and opens a constant and harmonious dialogue with the West. The West is the world beyond the house, sometimes urbanized and dystopian, sometimes limitless and dangerous, and other times simply beyond the doorstep.

In this conceptual safe space between the tatami and the West -translated in a tangible space through the Japanese architecture-, being alone with our kitchen could be not so bad.

ARCHITETTURA GIAPPONESE TRA IL TATAMI E IL WEST

Perché siamo affascinati dal minimalismo dell’architettura giapponese? Perché l’architettura giapponese ha una forza ordinatrice in grado di ordinare le nostre vite spesso troppo incasinate. Cerchiamo forme geometriche squadrate per organizzare il nostro West quotidiano nella speranza di trovare un tatami di approdo.

Luoghi Comuni

Non c’è posto al mondo che io ami più della cucina. Non importa dove si trova, com’è fatta: purché sia una cucina […] Siamo rimaste solo io e la cucina. Mi sembra un po’ meglio che pensare che sono rimasta proprio sola”, Kitchen, Banana Yoshimoto.

Ho sempre associato l’architettura giapponese alla solitudine. Nell’immaginario collettivo la casa giapponese è spesso un loculo smart futurista poco più grande di una persona messa a quattro di spade. Oppure è una spaziosa abitazione così ordinata e spoglia da sembrare uno showroom disabitato. O ancora, è una villa di legno e carta di riso molto silenziosa e circondata da ciliegi. In ogni caso un posto per persone sostanzialmente sole.

Tuttavia, il tatami, simbolo della casa giapponese, è un luogo di condivisione. Generalmente identifichiamo la spazio domestico giapponese nel tatami e nell’immagine di una famiglia seduta a terra nella stanza principale con grandi porte finestre.

Anche voi guardando i cartoni animati della fascia pomeridiana da bambino vi sarete chiesti: “Ma perché si tolgono le scarpe all’ingresso?” perchè nel tatami si può andare solo scalzi. Il tatami è una stuoia realizzata in paglia di riso ricoperta da uno strato di giunco e i bordi sono ornati da una fettuccia in cotone nero. Nel tatami ci si siede, ci si mangia e ci si dorme: il tatami è casa.

Oltre all’immagine meditativa del tatami, gli zaibatsu, la fantascienza cyberpunk e i tamagotchi hanno irrimediabilmente manipolato la percezione del Giappone della mia generazione. Elementi armonici di epoca Meiji si mescolavano ad incubi post atomici. Una sintesi incasinata come in Bamboo Houses di David Sylvian e Ryuichi Sakamoto.

I film di Yasujiro Ozu provavano a raccontare un Giappone più sincero ed umano, ma io mica ci credevo. Nei suoi film erano tutti così composti ed educati da sembrare ancora più soli. I protagonisti dei suoi film sembravano quasi posare in questi ambienti così sterili, ma allo stesso tempo così armonici e perfetti. Il protagonista era solo di passaggio in queste stanze eterne e non lasciava traccia di sé se nonin un monologo introspettivo fugace.

L’Ordine Giapponese

Le forme geometriche, i materiali naturali, il dialogo con la natura circostante, il minimalismo e il bilanciamento dei materiali: nell’architettura giapponese tutto è troppo perfetto per essere vero. La serie di video Japanese Collection di Vincent Hecht racconta quell’ austerità monocromatica apprezzata ed emulata in tutto il mondo. Il linguaggio architettonico giapponese è in grado di ordinare gli spazi di una realtà – la nostra- decisamente troppo disordinata.

Quindi è per questo che il minimalismo giapponese ci piace così tanto? Per la sua capacità di armonizzazione? Per la sua sintesi snella? Per la sua intelligente praticità? Per la sua coesione con elementi naturali? La risposta è sì. Il linguaggio visivo giapponese ha la forza ordinatrice della genesi: mette tutto in fila senza possibilità d’appello.

Il romanzo Dio odia il Giappone di Douglas Coupland racconta la storia di Hiro Tanaka, un ragazzo che vede la sua vita mediocre sconvolta da ingenti catastrofi di vario tipo. Alla domanda: perchè i giapponesi hanno questa attitudine ordinatrice? La risposta è proprio in questo libro. Terremoti, maremoti, bomba atomica, attacchi biologici: viene da pensare che Dio odi effettivamente il Giappone, almeno un pochino. Tuttavia, i giapponesi, da vero popolo moderno e secolarizzato, hanno risposto alla furia divina con l’ordine. E noi li invidiamo molto per questo.

Va da sé che The Japanese House è la mostra più ordinata, misurata e armonica che io abbia mai visto. The Japanese House è un’ esibizione interamente dedicata all’architettura giapponese dal 1945 ad oggi. L’idea ed è nata dalla collaborazione del Maxxi di Roma, il Momat di Tokyo e il l Barbican di Londra dove la mostra riaprirà il  23 marzo e sarà visitabile fino al 25 giugno.

Nonostante fosse una domenica affollata, le sale allestite sembravano quasi un tempio shintoista, tutto merito del lavoro eccezionale dello studio giapponese Atelier Bow-Wow, responsabile dell’allestimento della mostra. Oltre 60 autori, circa 80 modelli, fotografie, taccuini, disegni occupavano lo spazio in modo ordinato e armonico ricreando una dimensione quasi spirituale. I visitatori non si muovevano come in una mostra, ma come in un luogo sacro.

La mostra racconta circa mezzo secolo di architettura giapponese focalizzandosi sul concetto di casa unifamiliare. Un viaggio dalla tensione tra modernità e Japaneseness nell’immediato dopoguerra, per attraversare poi le utopie metaboliste degli anni ‘60 e il minimalismo degli anni ‘90, fino a introdurci all’attuale nuova attenzione per il vernacolare e per i materiali semplici.

La mostra nel contenuto e nella forma racconta esattamente questo minimalismo ordinato e terapeutico. Nel percorrere le 14 aree tematiche si intravedono però sfumature inaspettate: le sperimentazioni di Ito e Sakamoto, il linguaggio sensoriale e estraniante della White House di Shinohara, l’ironia di Face House, Anti-Dwelling Box, Miyajima House,e il tocco nostalgico delle Machiya (edifici tipici di epoca Edo) sapientemente rivisitate, come in House NA, House, O-ta o Moriyama House,

Il Selvaggio West

L’architettura giapponese è in grado di risolvere e di sintetizzare in modo immediato e estremamente semplice il rapporto tra l’individuo e lo spazio. Mettendo al centro ciò che lo spazio rappresenta per la persona che lo abita, la casa giapponese dialoga anche con lo spazio circostante in modo intelligente e sinergico.  

Per questo l’architettura giapponese è veramente ciò che divide il tatami e il West. Il tatami, inteso il luogo domestico trova la sua identità all’interno della casa giapponese che grazie alla sua architettura organizza gli spazi in un dialogo costante e armonioso con il West. Il West è il mondo oltre la casa, a volte urbanizzato e distopico, a volte sconfinato e pericoloso e altre volte semplicemente oltre la soglia.

In questo spazio concettuale, che si traduce in uno spazio fisico e tangibile, rimanere da soli con la propria cucina non è poi così male.